Archive for the 'Photography Tips' Category

Janet Klinger’s photo coaching helps you take the next step

Once again, I am offering photography coaching to the serious amateur, aspiring professional, and highly motivated parent. Topics include: photographing people, post processing: now what do I do with these images, and running a photography business.

JANET KLINGER PHOTOGRAPHY
2010 classes & coaching

YOU are the Portrait Photographer $150/hour ($115 if purchased with any other class/ photo session)
Join Janet for one-on-one personal coaching to become the photographer you’ve always dreamed of. Bring in your favorite subject(s) to model for you. You might choose to include props, outfit changes, inspiring music. Whether choosing a Seattle area location or taking advantage of Janet’s professional photography studio and Learn to love the beauty of North Light, or play with professional strobe equipment. Your camera equipment, or rent Janet’s Canon gear. Come play, explore and learn how to honor your creative side.

Post Processing in Camera Raw (PS CS4)
$110/hr
$195/3 hour session
$225/ 3 one-hour sessions
Now What? You’ve finished your photo session or filled your Flash Card with digital files. Learn how to quickly sort files then make your favorites as beautiful as the professionals. Learn to add drama, increase textures, intensify eyes, bring back lost highlights or shadows, color correct so everything isn’t “amateur orange”, crop for superior composition, apply oft-used settings to all your images, and more. As always you may choose to lead the direction each session explores. Taught by Janet and Staff.

Photo Coaching for Everyone
Personalized encouragement and instruction refining camera function, artistic sensibility, and developing intuition

Perhaps you need to better understand: your camera’s functions, when to use which lens, why images are out of focus, blurry, too dark or light, or how to use flash to enhance natural light.

Maybe you hope to improve your composition, increase your success-to-dud rate, add flair to fine but basic images, and discover consistent methods to intentionally repeat “happy accidents”.

You may be curious what all the fuss is over histograms, lighting ratios, fill flash or reflector use.

Bring up topics and questions, or let Janet use her intuitive instruction to help you electrify your next creative light bulb.

One-on-One
$85/hr
$195/3 hour session
$225/ 3 one-hour sessions

Group of Two or Three People
$120/hr
$275/3 hour session
$295/3 one-hour sessions

Business Coaching for the Up and Coming Professional Photographer
As more people notice your talents, perhaps you’re contemplating, or even diving into, the profession of photography. It’s no wonder. With over 25 years as a pro, I’m still in love with photographs and the people I meet because of my love for this art. Love and enthusiasm, even coupled with talent, does not a photographer make. So what now?

Above all, learn how to get your first professional jobs and what to charge. Remember, unless you get paid, you’re not a professional.

Let’s answer typical questions from those new to the photo biz such as:
Should you advertise, how much to charge, is a CPA necessary, how to keep track of income and pay taxes, utilize typical tax breaks, legal means of deducting travel, organizations to join, the necessity of a business bank account, is taking out a loan ever wise, is it necessary to purchase the latest gear, travel to seminars, give away photography services, get a partner …

This profession may not be for the faint of heart, but for those willing to learn what it takes and apply this knowledge, there may be a meaningful, heart-warming, and rewarding profession beginning with your next CLICK!

One-on-One
$125/hr
$295/3 hour session
$345/ 3 one-hour sessions

Group of Two or Three People
$150/hr
$390/3 hour session
$420/3 one-hour sessions

Mamas with Cameras Teach me a Lesson

I was honored to speak at last nights “Mamas with Cameras” photo club gathering. I was so impressed with these Mamas. More than half have children under two and several with newborns yet they are able to take time for themselves, simultaneously cultivating their creative passion for photography. This caring sisterhood shared ideas and encouraged each other, all while feeding that female-need I know all about for socializing and making new friends. I’m inspired by these motivated mama’s passion. (more…)

Maria and Ray go to Lofty Heights in Downtown Seattle

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Maria & Ray get cosy above downtown Seattle

080712w_eng_35.jpgEngagement sessions are invaluable. How many times have I heard “My fiance hates to have his picture taken”, or “I am so awkward in front of the camera”. These sentiments are based in truth as known prior to working with a pro photographer, yet are dispelled as myths upon seeing the images. Confidence is built. And not simply with the couple, but with all those invited to view their images on-line or around the coffee table.

Let’s face it. Uncle Joe may have the same camera as the pros, but does he know how to find great locations, compose, inspire his models, and most importantly, does Uncle Joe know when to press the shutter? Timing is at least 50% of a good photo. Everyone who’s been snapped mid-sentence, eating, or at an awkward moment is susceptible to thinking they are unfit to be photographed. (Just avoid this uncle masquerading as a photographer until he comes to one of my Photography for Beginners classes!)

Location’s influence on a successful image fluctuates dramatically in importance. If the scene is horrific, as some basement-of-the-church receptions are, then lighting, lens choice, angle, and model’s inspiration and expression reign supreme. But if the location is even slightly interesting, why wouldn’t you want a significant portion of the images to glorify your unique choice of environment?

Every time I hear a version of “We look horrible in photographs”, I know this client will benefit even more than the usual from an engagement session. Invaluable is the confidence gained by seeing how great you look when in front of a pro’s lens. Invaluable is the experience of working together as a team before your wedding day to gain rapport. Even family members gain confidence about how good THEY will look. One of the many wonderful side effects of engagement sessions is how helpful, inspired, and interested family and wedding party become in making the photos great. We’re a team on the wedding day. It’s great to have everyone working toward the same goal.

080712w_eng_59.jpgTake the time for an engagement session. In 3 of our 5 wedding packages it’s included at no charge. In Options I and II add a simple one hour engagement session for $395, or an extended three hour engagement session allowing us time to explore a complete range of ideas. For a complete list of custom engagement options, visit the websites’s Cost section, and choose the “Tell your story- Engagement and bridal” botton at the top.

And thank you to Maria and Ray for the fun session — they’ve put together a website for their upcoming wedding at RayFinallyAsked.com

Rain Rain Go Away, But not ye old faithful Canon Camera and Lenses

Every photographer or hobbiest who buys new camera gear makes a decision. What to do with the old and replaced. I use these retired old Canon bodies and lenses on days like today. Heavy misting rain along with blustering winds makes keeping a camera dry impossible. Putting the camera and lens in a plastic bag with a hole cut out for the lens helps. I don’t want to be afraid to shoot on sandy beaches, on dirty, dusty trails, on canoe trips, or in our ever-present rain. The next time someone asks why some of my gear looks like it gone through the ringer, well…

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Expressiveness isn’t limited to smiles.

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Ellie Explorer.

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Just checking in!

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Soaked and smiling! Love that girl!!!

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This old Canon 70-200 lens and 20D still capture sharp, vibrant color, even when wet, dropped, and near freezing. Hell, I’m not sure why I bought a new one. OK, the image stabilization and faster aperture had something to do with it. With Seattle’s ever wet days, I’m glad to have a lens I’m willing to risk. But I sure wish Canon would start sponsoring me!

Baby Photography Success, Not Stress

Preparing for a photo session pays off. No tears for baby, no tears for you.
It can be stressful asking your child to leave the house at an unusual time, to alter bath time, nap time, meal time. Highly recommended is scheduling your sessions around these known times IF your session is AWAY from home. (More later on in-home sessions.) When possible, try to prepare all clothing, props and even snacks one or two days before the session. Keep your session day as “normal” as possible. If you dream of happy baby photography, take care of yourself and Baby with a little advanced planning. Raise your milk cups and sip to success!

NOTE: If you don’t manage to plan, it’s completely understandable. You are a Parent!!! Great photos are still likely. I really want you to love the whole experience, not just the photos!

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Even with great pre-planning, baby may need a minute to become comfy with the environment. Apprehension sure is cute!
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Warming up!

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Now we’re best of friends!

Don’t Wake the Baby!

I prefer baby photo sessions unfold naturally. If the baby is still sleeping when you (or I) arrive, Golly-Me, don’t wake her!!! In some sessions we actually spend time waiting for sleep to overcome our “Star”. If she is grumpy when falling to sleep, I may take a few shots to capture the pouting moment, but I’ll also concentrate on the nurturing, soothing connection of Daddy rocking babe to sleep. Maybe I’ll get a shot of giant hand engulfing tiny foot. Sleep is a baby’s most relaxed state, and that utter calm is gorgeous. Let sleeping babies lie.

Peaceful sleeping baby face

sleeping baby in red

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Photograph your own Children

I’ve taught parents for years how to photograph children, but since becoming a mom I’ve had to prioritize. My goal is to begin photo seminars again next Spring, so stay tuned. For the time being, I have two things I can offer.
1) I’ve been answering your photo questions via e-mail and phone. Now I’ll post tips occasionally on this blog. Look under category Mom and Dad Resources- Photography Tips.

2) Me Ra Koh has begun teaching “A Childs Life” class in Tacoma. Her workshop is more an all weekend intensive specifically designed for moms. Sounds Fabulous! I might join the fun one of these sessions!